Thursday, 20 February 2020 00:00

What is Visceral Manipulation

Written by 
Rate this item
(0 votes)

 

  Visceral Manipulation relies on the palpation of normal and abnormal forces within the body. By using specific techniques, therapists can evaluate how abnormal forces interplay, overlap and affect the normal body forces at work. The goal is to help the body’s normal forces remove abnormal effects, whatever their sources. Those effects can be global, encompassing many areas of bodily function.

   VM assists functional and structural imbalances throughout the body including musculoskeletal, vascular, nervous, urogenital, respiratory, digestive and lymphatic dysfunction. It evaluates and treats the dynamics of motion and suspension in relation to organs, membranes, fascia and ligaments. VM increases proprioceptive communication within the body, thereby revitalizing a person and relieving symptoms of pain, dysfunction, and poor posture.

An integrative approach to evaluation and treatment of a patient requires assessment of the structural relationships between the viscera, and their fascial or ligamentous attachments to the musculoskeletal system. Strains in the connective tissue of the viscera can result from surgical scars, adhesions, illness, posture or injury. Tension patterns form through the fascial network deep within the body, creating a cascade of effects far from their sources for which the body will have to compensate. This creates fixed, abnormal points of tension that the body must move around, and this chronic irritation gives way to functional and structural problems.

There are definite links between somatic structures, such as the muscles and joints, the sympathetic nervous system, the visceral organs, the spinal cord and the brain. For example, the sinuvertebral nerves innervate the intervertebral disks and have direct connections with the sympathetic nervous system, which innervates the visceral organs. The sinuvertebral nerves and sympathetic nervous system are linked to the spinal cord, which has connections with the brain. In this way someone with chronic pain can have irritations and facilitated areas not only in the musculoskeletal system (including joints, muscles, fascia, and disks) but also the visceral organs and their connective tissues (including the liver, stomach, gallbladder, intestines and adrenal glands), the peripheral nervous system, the sympathetic nervous system and even the spinal cord and brain.

Imagine an adhesion around the lungs. It would create a modified axis that demands abnormal accommodations from nearby body structures. For example, the adhesion could alter rib motion, which could then create imbalanced forces on the vertebral column and, with time, possibly develop a dysfunctional relationship with other structures. This scenario highlights just one of the hundreds of possible ramifications of a small dysfunction – magnified by thousands of repetitions each day.

Thanks to the dedicated work of Jean-Pierre Barral, a Physiotherapist (RPT) and Osteopath (DO), healthcare practitioners today can use the rhythmic motions of the visceral system as important therapeutic tools.


Research

Comparative studies found Visceral Manipulation beneficial for various disorders.

 

Women’s and Men’s Health Issues

Chronic Pelvic Pain

Endometriosis

Fibroids and Cysts

Dysmenorrhea

Bladder Incontinence

Prostate Dysfunction

Referred Testicular Pain

Effects of Menopause

 

Acute Disorders

Whiplash

Seatbelt Injuries

Chest or Abdominal Sports Injuries

Concussion

Traumatic Brain Injuries

 

Digestive Disorders

Bloating and Constipation

Nausea and Acid Reflux

GERD

Swallowing Dysfunctions

 

Musculoskeletal Disorders

Somatic-Visceral Interactions

Chronic Spinal Dysfunction

Headaches and Migraines

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Peripheral Joint Pain

Sciatica

 

Pediatric Issues

Constipation and Gastritis

Persistent Vomiting

Vesicoureteral Reflux

Infant Colic

 

Pain Related to

Post-operative Scar Tissue

Post-infection Scar Tissue

Autonomic Mechanisms

 

Emotional Issues

Anxiety and Depression

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Read 102 times Last modified on Thursday, 20 February 2020 13:56